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Switzerland. LAccording to letters from Switzerland, Switzerland. According to letters from Switzerland,
the excessive heat has caused the snow to melt the excessive heat has caused the snow to melt
from the tops of the mountains. The I summit from the tops of the mountains. The I summit
of Mont Blaet is now a bare rocl, a sight not of Mont Blanc is now a bare rock, a sight not
seen for many veats. Sutce of the rivers have seen for many years. Sutce of the rivers have
swvollen in consequence and Ioverdowed their swollen in consequence and overflowed their
banks. 'United States. Mr, W~asbington Irving, banks. United States. Mr, Washington Irving,
for some time Minister Plenipotentiary 1 of for some time Minister Plenipotentiary 1 of
the United States ill Miadrid, is succeeded the United States will Madrid, is succeeded
in that office by Mr I Saunders. I S.:LAtNG A in that office by Mr T Saunders. I S.LANG A
Mrl 'I srT En.-The free coloured people of Washing- Mrl 'I srT pm-The free coloured people of Washington
ton have recently held a fair for the purpose have recently held a fair for the purpose
of raising money sufficient to bull their minister, of raising money sufficient to bulk their minister,
who it seems is owned by some- body in thi:t city; who it seems is owned by some- body in this city;
and who values him at least at three hundred and who values him at least at three hundred
dollars. The fair was held onl tile 4th of July; dollars. The fair was held on the 4th of July;
and what a de- graded and degrading picture and what a degraded and degrading picture
does it present of our boasted free- oim, our does it present of our boasted free- on, our
"glorions land of liberty." While thousands "glorious land of liberty." While thousands
and tens 3 of thousands of 4th of `July orators and tens 3 of thousands of 4th of July orators
were crarking on," about t our free country, were cracking on," about t our free country,
a society of poor negroes were withn sineht a society of poor negroes were within sight
of the Capitol and Whice House, bringing their of the Capitol and White House, bringing their
small oblations of -merchandise to pvirchase small oblations of merchandise to purchase
therewith the freedom of a minister of God.-The therewith the freedom of a minister of God The
(American) Christiaom Citizen, edited by (American) Christian Citizen, edited by
E. Burritt. e Canada. The crops throughout E. Burritt. e Canada. The crops throughout
Lower Canada have the most favour- able appearance. Lower Canada have the most favourable appearance.
We hear that to the westward of Toronto a s good We hear that to the westward of Toronto a a good
deal of grain has been injured by rust. American deal of grain has been injured by rust. American
wheat has been declared admissible irto Canada wheat has been declared admissible into Canada
in bond, for the purpose of being ground and in bond for the purpose of being ground and
exported duty free. West Indies. The West India exported duty free. West Indies. The West India
Mail has arrived, bringing dates fromn Denier- Mail has arrived, bringing dates from Denier-
ara to the 19th, and from Jamaica are to the 19th, and from Jamaica
to the 2ith July. The news from Jamnicat is of to the 24th July. The news from Jamaica is of
the same character as formerly. Rain had f fallen, the same character as formerly. Rain had of fallen,
bitt hot enough to redeeml the crop. In the other but hot enough to redeem the crop. In the other
colonies e nothing hal occurred worthy of notice. colonies e nothing had occurred worthy of notice.
Cl Tredia ri~and China. WI Cr Tredea inland China. WE
We have received by sxtraordinary express We have received by extraordinary express
front Marseilles o the despatches in attivipati from Marseilles of the despatches in anticipate
n of the overland mail from India, sbrought n of the overland mail from India, brought
to Suez by the Hindosusii. The ittelligence to Suez by the Hindosusii. The intelligence
is up to the ad2 ot July. t Quiet travails at Lahore, is up to the ad2 of July, t Quiet travails at Lahore,
and there are now no symptouts of it inter -ttin and there are now no symptoms of it later thin
e Tihd Wuzeer, Rajah Lall Singh has not et d emanded e Tihd Wuzeer, Rajah Lalla Singh has not yet demanded
the withi- dsiwxal of the lmritish tsoops. the with- drawal of the British troops.
The Ranioe has had a dispute with the British The Range has had a dispute with the British
agent, and has intimated her readiness to help agent, and has intimated her readiness to help
the troops away, At iXurrachee the cholera the troops away, At iXurrachee the cholera
was raging w1ith great fierceness Tlie number was raging with great fierceness The number
of deaths of Ehnropeans alone on the 15th, 16th. of deaths of Europeans alone on the 15th, 16th.
and lIth of Jolle, is stated to be 235, and upwardds and 11th of Jolle, is stated to be 235, and upwards
of lOo of these d cases belong to her Majesty's of 100 of these d cases belong to her Majesty's
36th reginment. No Officeris men- tioned asm 96th regiment. No Officers mentioned as
having fallen a victimi. The namtives were having fallen a victim. The natives were
dying bv hunldrds. Reports were currett of dying by hundreds. Reports were current of
the approaclhing retirement fruio the governmeint the approaching retirement from the government
of Madras of the Marqui, of '['weeddale. 'Dile of Madras of the Marquis of Tweeddale, 'Dile
faest itnii.ortant news brought by this arrival fast itnii.ortant news brought by this arrival
is front Ca- o bool vi here it appears nit ambassador is front Ca- o book where it appears not ambassador
from the King of PersiaI o bud teen received from the King of Persia o had been received
by Dost 1Mahliumed, whose ohject was to exeite by Dost Mahommed, whose object was to excite
i the Afglianist:ns to declare hostilities the Afghanistan's to declare hostilities
against rite British; but Dust Mlahotmmeu against rite British; but Dust Mlahotmmeu
reflised to accede to the proposal. d 1romn refused to accede to the proposal. d From
Chuta we learn that the British authorities China we learn that the British authorities
lad not givenl .s up Chusaei according to the had not given us up Chusaei according to the
ter iis of the treaty, and a Chinese nmob had terms of the treaty, and a Chinese mob had
expelLed foreign residents from the city of expelled foreign residents from the city of
Fow-chow- I fo! . HiLtlerto the Foochow- I fo! Hitherto the
violence of the populace had been confined violence of the populace had been confined
to the city of Canton; if it extends to the eastern to the city of Canton; if it extends to the eastern
ports, we may , again see our commerce thrust ports, we may , again see our commerce thrust
out of China, and once nuore have to recover out of China, and once more have to recover
it by floce of arms. CAUSES OF. - AP S RETIREET. it by force of arms. CAUSES OF. - AP S RETIREET.
, , a. ., I 1 . ,: I r- Th Lice'ye Albioncgives'an , a I 1 . ,: I r- Th Lice'ye Albioncgives'an
entirely diffesrenit version of I istecue entirely different version of I esteem
rthe recent chiange in the Ministry fromi any the recent change in the Ministry from any
yet as- Por is igned by the London press. We qut yet aster is signed by the London press. We que
te following, singular her ~ tatement:- Wequt te following, singular her a statement:- Wequt
i eap "Tie immediate antecedents to the eventful i ear "The immediate antecedents to the eventful
occurrenco first Proe 5publicly peade known. occurrence first Free publicly peade known.
on, Tuesday morning wore, we- are given I.to on Tuesday morning wore, we are given to
understand, these, Lord P1almereton had intended understand, these, Lord Palmerston had intended
affording t!mr Ivan offical interview to lKdssulth, affording time Ivan offical interview to lKdssulth,
and had expressed such purpose sag 'f to Lord and had expressed such purpose sag 'f to Lord
Dudley Stuart, when on a visit to Broadlands, Dudley Stuart, when on a visit to Broadlands,
'just, - 58 previous to the Hunugarian's arrival 'just, - 58 previous to the Hungarian s arrival
at Southampton. Through 0 Lord.Dudley's comuneuicativcness, at Southampton. Through 0 Lord. Dudley's comuneuicativcness,
or otherwise, and it is quite animmaterial or otherwise, and it is quite and material
how, the report of this intimation reached how, the report of this intimation reached
the emble dlsecretary's antagonist in the the emble dlsecretary's antagonist in the
Cabinet. A Council was called, e and the propriety Cabinet. A Council was called, and the propriety
of the proposed reception was not so much~ de-If of the proposed reception was not so much de-If
nounced. for its probable MISeleievousncess nounced. for its probable MISeleievousncess
as ridiculed for its c poeitivo folly, by Lord as ridiculed for its c positive folly, by Lord
Grey, and More particularly by Sir~ C. Live Grey, and More particularly by Sir C. Live
Y Wood, his brother-in-jaw, reputed to be the Y Wood, his brother-in-law, reputed to be the
moet bellicose of his Bri' r clan in the Government most bellicose of his Brit' r clan in the Government
against Lord Palmerston. Tue noble Hul llord against Lord Palmerston. The noble Hul Lord
adhered to his original conviction, namely, adhered to his original conviction, namely,
that Lthe i ndi- Nell viduial in behalf of whose that the i and- Nell vidual in behalf of whose
liberation it 'was deemed expedient Soul and liberation it was deemed expedient Soul and
becoming to emaploy the most earnest interfereuco becoming to employ the most earnest interference
of leer Gis, Y Majesty's Government, was quite of leer Gis, Y Majesty's Government, was quite
entitled to he received officiatlly, Liii entitled to be received officially, Line
c by that member of: the Administration whose c by that member of the Administration whose
duty it mere imt- - ?.media tely. is to treat duty it mere inst- - remedial tely. is to treat
with foreigners. As, however, the Grey A section with foreigners. As, however, the Grey A section
took a contrary view, ho would not compromise. took a contrary view, he would not compromise.
the mar aCabinet hy speaking to IKeseuth in the mar Cabinet by speaking to IKeseuth in
tics name of his collieag els as ho would leave tics name of his colleagues as he would leave
had to do had the interview taken pace. 11 But had to do had the interview taken pace. 11 But
he would not so far stultify himself as to give he would not so far stultify himself as to give
utterance in Lv public to sentiments ties reverse utterance in Lv public to sentiments ties reverse
of these that had freed the T prisoner; and, of these that had freed the T prisoner; and,
accordingly,. ho availed himself of the Islington accordingly,. he availed himself of the Islington
lung deputation to make some remarks which, lung deputation to make some remarks which,
though by no meansoft t of the precise complexion though by no means oft t of the precise complexion
desorihedin thejournals, were yet suLf- ficliectly described in the journals, were yet suLf- indirectly
obnoxious to his dissentient colleagues to obnoxious to his dissentient colleagues to
provoke oem-mentaries at the next Council, provoke commentaries at the next Council,
which led the noble lord to say,, 0ethat his which led the noble lord to say,, 0ethat his
critics might conduct affatirs as they pleased critics might conduct affairs as they pleased
for thle tfuture, best he would not be a patty for the future, best he would not be a party
to their managemenct. The 0 Cabinet was virtually to their management. The 0 Cabinet was virtually
dissolved in consequence of this rupture __ dissolved in consequence of this rupture in
and the Council of the 3d of December, expressly and the Council of the 3d of December, expressly
summoned at DuO Lord Palmerston's own instigation, summoned at DuO Lord Palmerston's own instigation,
(be keeping away,) to; pro-Deli, -snonnee (be keeping away,) to; pro-Deli, -service
on his pro-ltossuth address to the deputation,~ on his pro-ltossuth address to the deputation
would Cone have been the last affong thes would Cone have been the last along they
"uceitod" individualities of flown- C, ing "received" individualities of flown- C, ing
Street, weroit not for the tidings from Padis Street, were it not for the tidings from Paris
of thee previous criea day, which prompted of thee previous cries day, which prompted
a snspoension of internlecinle tootle for a suspension of internecine tools for
a while, in the presence of what Might have been a while, in the presence of what Might have been
a predominant the' external dangee-. But ties a predominant the' external danger-. But ties
virulence broke out again on a very M tinsigni-ficant virulence broke out again on a very M tinsigni-ficant
matter connected with Angle-F rench affairs; matter connected with Anglo-French affairs;
and 0the upshot is before us. We are pci-suanded, and the upshot is before us. We are persuaded,
and* we speak ad-fvisedly, that if ever the and we speak advisedly, that if ever the
Ministerial history of the past weeks comesto'be Ministerial history of the past weeks comesto'be
told by ainy of Lieu principals, the substance told by any of Lieu principals, the substance
of the foregoing statement will ho fully verified. of the foregoing statement will be fully verified.
, WARRINGTO1N. ANTI-SLAVERY MEETING.-A very , MARRINGTON. ANTI-SLAVERY MEETING-A very
numerous and respectable meeting was held numerous and respectable meeting was held
in the Mechanics' Lecture Hall, Warrington, in the Mechanics' Lecture Hall, Warrington,
on Tuesday evening, to hear an ad- dress from on Tuesday evening, to hear an address from
Frederick Douglass, the celebrated fugitive Frederick Douglass, the celebrated fugitive
slave.. The building was crowded in every part. slave.. The building was crowded in every part.
IV. Wilson,. Esq., occupied the chair, and IV. Wilson,. Esq., occupied the chair, and
we noticed many of the most influential inhabitants we noticed many of the most influential inhabitants
of the town amongst those present.-Mr. Douglass of the town amongst those present Mr. Douglass
deeply interested his audi- ence with an eloquent deeply interested his audience with an eloquent
and thrilling address upon the evils of American and thrilling address upon the evils of American
slavery. At its close the following resolution slavery. At its close the following resolution
was moved by William Robson, Esq., seconded was moved by William Robson, Esq., seconded
by Peter Rylands, Esq., and carried amidst by Peter Rylands, Esq., and carried amidst
loud ap- plause: -" That in the opinion loud applause: " That in the opinion
of this meeting all sys- tems of human government of this meeting all systems of human government
and laws which have for their inevitable result and laws which have for their inevitable result
the degradation of the negro race are essentially the degradation of the negro race are essentially
anti-Christian; that all persons who sup- anti-Christian; that all persons who support
port such systems are deeply criminal, and such systems are deeply criminal, and
all who take advantage of thena for the purpose all who take advantage of them for the purpose
of holding human beings in slavery are worthy-of of holding human beings in slavery are worthy of
the sternest reprobation; and that, more particularly, the sternest reprobation; and that, more particularly,
the abettors and upholders of American slavery the abettors and upholders of American slavery
are acting in direct opposition to the principles are acting in direct opposition to the principles
of ChristiAnity, aind are unveorthy of the of Christianity, and are unworthy of the
Christian name."- In all the speeches the course Christian name."- In all the speeches the course
pur- sued by the Free Church of Scotland and pursued by the Free Church of Scotland and
the Evangelical Alliance was severely condemned. the Evangelical Alliance was severely condemned.
- Resolutions of thanks to Mr. Douglass and - Resolutions of thanks to Mr. Douglass and
the chairman were carried by accla-mation., the chairman were carried by acclamation.,
EPITOME OF OPINION IN THE MORNING JOURNALS. EPITOME OF OPINION IN THE MORNING JOURNALS.
EUROPEAN RIVALRIES AND TI-IE EASTERN QUESTION. EUROPEAN RIVALRIES AND THE EASTERN QUESTION.
The Post says we may form an opinion of the manner The Post says we may form an opinion of the manner
in which the "Christian Powers " would have in which the "Christian Powers " would have
agreed upon the reconstruction of Otto- iran agreed upon the reconstruction of Otto- iran
administration in Bulgaria by observing the administration in Bulgaria by observing the
spectacle of open discord and mutual suspicion spectacle of open discord and mutual suspicion
which they present among themselves. At Paris, which they present among themselves. At Paris,
at Vienna, but most of all at Berlin and St. Petersburg, at Vienna, but most of all at Berlin and St. Petersburg,
statesmen are plotting and counter-plotting, statesmen are plotting and counter-plotting,
official and semi-official journals are giving official and semi-official journals are giving
vent to reproaches mingled with menaces, and vent to reproaches mingled with menaces, and
public opinion is excited with fears and hatreds. public opinion is excited with fears and hatreds.
On every side it is con- fessedithat the jealousies On every side it is con- fessed that the jealousies
and ambitions of the European nations are standing and ambitions of the European nations are standing
perils to the peace of Europe which throw entirely perils to the peace of Europe which throw entirely
into the shade all other considerations. For into the shade all other considerations. For
a time it almost seemed that the deadly game a time it almost seemed that the deadly game
of the great annexationists would be carried of the great annexationists would be carried
out in the first place at the expense of the Turkish out in the first place at the expense of the Turkish
Empire, but, foiled by the calm statesmanship Empire, but, foiled by the calm statesmanship
of the luikish Government, the rivals are again of the Turkish Government, the rivals are again
dropping their disguise and resumning their dropping their disguise and resuming their
old characters. It is idle to talk of the gravity old characters. It is idle to talk of the gravity
of the Eastern Question in face of the gravity of the Eastern Question in face of the gravity
of the European Question. The Eastern situation of the European Question. The Eastern situation
takes all its seriousness from the seriousness takes all its seriousness from the seriousness
of the general situation in Europe. While the of the general situation in Europe. While the
Plenipotentiaries of the Powers were proposing Plenipotentiaries of the Powers were proposing
childish panaceas of superficial humanitarianism childish panaceas of superficial humanitarianism
at Constanti- nople, the Governments of those at Constantinople, the Governments of those
Great Powers themselves were only speculating Great Powers themselves were only speculating
on the chances which a complication in Turkey on the chances which a complication in Turkey
might afford for making this or that move at might afford for making this or that move at
the expense of a neighbouring nation. In the the expense of a neighbouring nation. In the
present condition of Europe, infinitely more present condition of Europe, infinitely more
" diseased " than Turkey ever was in the gloomiest " diseased " than Turkey ever was in the gloomiest
prophecies of the atrocity-mongers, we should prophecies of the atrocity-mongers, we should
read the warning to abjure once and for all an read the warning to abjure once and for all an
inopportune sentimentalism, anid to remember inopportune sentimentalism, and to remember
that if Englishmen overlook British interests, that if Englishmen overlook British interests,
none else will defend them. THE CLOSE OF TIHE none else will defend them. THE CLOSE OF THE
CONFERENCE. The livues observes that the closing CONFERENCE. The Times observes that the closing
of the Conference marks the end arotlher stage of the Conference marks the end another stage
of the Eastern Question, and no one is bold enough of the Eastern Question, and no one is bold enough
to say of vlhat will follovw. As to whether the to say of what will follow. As to whether the
calling together of the Conference Nias in calling together of the Conference Nies in
itself a mistake, the Tizoes has no hesitation itself a mistake, the Tizoes has no hesitation
in saying that the pro-1,osal of the Conference in saying that the proposal of the Conference
needs no justification, whatever view we take needs no justification, whatever view we take
of the future. It has demonstrated a large measure of the future. It has demonstrated a large measure
of agreement among the European Powers on the of agreement among the European Powers on the
question not merely on the policy to be pursued question not merely on the policy to be pursued
in dealing with Turkey, but also on the particular in dealing with Turkey, but also on the particular
practical acts in which it should be embodied. practical acts in which it should be embodied.
The realization of this unanimity is in itself The realization of this unanimity is in itself
a great gain, the value of which is not wholly a great gain, the value of which is not wholly
destroyed by what followed. But when the recommendations destroyed by what followed. But when the recommendations
of the Conference were sedulously discredited of the Conference were sedulously discredited
by English critics, it easily came to pass that by English critics, it easily came to pass that
they should be rejected. 'J he end hoped for they should be rejected. The end hoped for
in assembling the Conference has not been obtained in assembling the Conference has not been obtained
because that concurrence of external authority because that concurrence of external authority
on which reliance was placed was not realized. on which reliance was placed was not realized.
The Eastern Question, however, is not solved The Eastern Question, however, is not solved
by being thrown back upon our hands; and though by being thrown back upon our hands; and though
its solution may be deferred, no one supposes its solution may be deferred, no one supposes
that it can be long delayed. To have sub-stituted that it can be long delayed. To have substituted
a process of peaceful evolution for the uncertainties a process of peaceful evolution for the uncertainties
of the swoid in passing through a single stage of the sword in passing through a single stage
of the great transformation Europe {w ill have of the great transformation Europe {w ill have
to witness would have been an enormous gain to witness would have been an enormous gain
to Europe. We have lost this, and we have lost to Europe. We have lost this, and we have lost
another advantage, which would have been rcought another advantage, which would have been caught
in its train bad it been realized. The greatest in its train had it been realized. The greatest
drawback to the progress of Western civilization drawback to the progress of Western civilization
is the intensity of international distrust. is the intensity of international distrust.
I-ad we worbied out this Eastern Question side Had we worried out this Eastern Question side
by side with Russia, we should have done much by side with Russia, we should have done much
to purge ourselves of an exaggerated apprehension to purge ourselves of an exaggerated apprehension
that now too often threatens to draw upon us that now too often threatens to draw upon us
the evils we fear. Bxth Russia and England would the evils we fear. Both Russia and England would
have been better by this educational experience. have been better by this educational experience.
The Dail, Tlc'/eapM/ maintains that, slight The Dail, Tlc'/eapM/ maintains that slight
disappointments apart, the course of events disappointments apart, the course of events
has been singularly favourable for England. has been singularly favourable for England.
Laying aside the foolish things which will Laying aside the foolish things which will
be said by the enthusiasts of " co-operation"' be said by the enthusiasts of " co-operation"'
to cover their private chagrin, public opinion to cover their private chagrin, public opinion
may well be grateful to Lord Salisbury for the may well be grateful to Lord Salisbury for the
negative success which he has obtained. His negative success which he has obtained. His
efforts have eliminated from the Russian demands efforts have eliminated from the Russian demands
whatever was large enough to make war plausible whatever was large enough to make war plausible
or defensible; and there remains no casus belli or defensible; and there remains no casus belli
except the Moscow speech; while to shed rivers except the Moscow speech; while to shed rivers
of human blood because a Czar had spoken rashly of human blood because a Czar had spoken rashly
would indeed be a dreadful sort of piety. In would indeed be a dreadful sort of piety. In
place of the scheme of reform which the envoys place of the scheme of reform which the envoys
could not induce Turkey to accept, we have the could not induce Turkey to accept, we have the
Constitution actually enacted and existing. Constitution actually enacted and existing.
All this, it will be objected, is not "a settlement All this, it will be objected, is not a settlement
;" but then nothing would have been "a settlement," ;" but then nothing would have been a settlement,"
for the Eastern Question does not yet admit for the Eastern Question does not yet admit
any ultimate solution, or certainly not from any ultimate solution, or certainly not from
without. What. ever hereafter befalls, the without. What. ever hereafter befalls, the
existing situation presents us with almost existing situation presents us with almost
all the good that could possibly be expected all the good that could possibly be expected
from past complications. The Slandard remarks from past complications. The Standard remarks
that the world now awaits with anxiety the action that the world now awaits with anxiety the action
of Russia. With her it clearly rests to make of Russia. With her it clearly rests to make
the next move, if move there is to be. She fanned the next move, if move there is to be. She fanned
the insurrection in Bosnia and the Herzegovina. the insurrection in Bosnia and the Herzegovina.
She incited Servia to make war upon its suzerain, She invited Servia to make war upon its suzerain,
lending aid, both in men and money, to the enterprise. lending aid, both in men and money, to the enterprise.
She compelled the armistice under a threat She compelled the armistice under a threat
of hostilities. And she brought about the Conference of hostilities. And she brought about the Conference
by the menacing attitude she assumed. On a review by the menacing attitude she assumed. On a review
of the situation, the Standard thinks that of the situation, the Standard thinks that
the tendency of Russia is for the present towards the tendency of Russia is for the present towards
peace. At the same time it would be over-sanguine peace. At the same time it would be over-sanguine
to conclude that there will be no war. The Daily to conclude that there will be no war. The Daily
Ncws, although the common inclination is to News, although the common inclination is to
believe that Russia is all but helpless, that believe that Russia is all but helpless, that
she is only anxious to back out of 'a false position she is only anxious to back out of a false position
rashly assumed, and that there will consequently rashly assumed, and that there will consequently
be no war, holds that the probabilities do not be no war, holds that the probabilities do not
by any means seem to be that the Emperor's Moscow by any means seem to be that the Emperor's Moscow
speech promised a policy which has already speech promised a policy which has already
been wholly abandoned. There is, however, been wholly abandoned. There is, however,
at least one reason which would naturally confirm at least one reason which would naturally confirm
the belief that in any case war is not likely the belief that in any case war is not likely
to be inmmediate. Before undertaking any serious to be immediate. Before undertaking any serious
movement on her own account, Russia would naturally movement on her own account, Russia would naturally
have to assure herself as to the probable action have to assure herself as to the probable action
in such a case of some of the Great Powers. It in such a case of some of the Great Powers. It
is not likely that she would leap into the arena is not likely that she would leap into the arena
all at once, and prepare to engage Turkey without all at once, and prepare to engage Turkey without
any consideration as to the attitude of her any consideration as to the attitude of her
neighbours. LITERAXT NISELLANEA. : I -- --- neighbours. LITERAXT NISELLANEA. : I ----
de . A PEANO ea.T .4N with anding SIheir poetic de . A PEANO easT AN with anding SIheir poetic
admiiatidn d:llowers, the Perdian treat them admiration followers, the Persian treat them
with much neglect; W 7 there are many which ara with much neglect; W 7 there are many which are
hf 1i1asnd well wo*_y oiotiee.- The mosot re of Hiland well worth notice.- The most re
iareable'rn apearne i a rge rose-tree, called iareable'rn apearne i a rge rose-tree, called
the Nasteraun:; J.tt growe to the ii0cght of the Nasteraun:; Just grows to the height of
twenty-feet; tho trunk is niearly two feet twenty-feet; the trunk is nearly two feet
in circumference; the fower, thodgh large, in circumference; the Lower, though large,
resembles the ,English Iead-r ,ae sd-hPs five resembles the English reader as sashes five
loaves; the calyx is in the ;for of a belL The loaves; the calyx is in the form of a bell The
leaf of the tree is small, smooth, and shining. leaf of the tree is small, smooth, and shining.
The branches droop gracefully to the ground, The branches droop gracefully to the ground,
and tha flowers are so abundant as completely and the flowers are so abundant as completely
ta oonce th* "stem of'the tree. Numbers of this as once the "stem of the tree. Numbers of this
species are to be seen in every garden in Teheran. species are to be seen in every garden in Teheran.
PRIDE ANeD VA.rrY.- OstontatIon, in its strict PRIDE AND VANITY.- Ostentation, in its strict
senee, Is -vanity; -yet the2thing sense, Is vanity; yet the thing
.f which-a display is nsde, may i itself be a of which-a display is made, may i itself be a
motive of pride, as has already been remarked motive of pride, as has already been remarked
of virtue: nay,,prlde itself may be a motive of virtue: nay, pride itself may be a motive
of vanity, as in the case of a man who, having of vanity, as in the case of a man who, having
acted with becoming pride, Rroclaims to the acted with becoming pride, Proclaims to the
world tbat he has done so; or, ip other words, world that he has done so; or, in other words,
a man may be vain of his pride; but no man was ever a man may be vain of his pride; but no man was ever
proud of his vanity. We do not fear to let the proud of his vanity. We do not fear to let the
world know how highly we value the awards of world know how highly we value the awards of
conscience; but wee are ashamed to own, even conscience; but we are ashamed to own, even
to ourselves, that having once attained the to ourselves, that having once attained the
approbation of so competent a judge, we can approbation of so competent a judge, we can
stoop, to court an inferior authority. Pride stoop to court an inferior authority. Pride
may be oomnpared to the sun, .which ripens the may be compared to the sun, which ripens the
plant in silence- vanity to the breeze; which plant in silence- vanity to the breeze; which
spreads its fragrnce through the world. Loan spreads its fragrance through the world. Loan
PAifexTo.. -No fair critic of public men can PAifexTo.. -No fair critic of public men can
deny that Lord Palmerston is a statesman of deny that Lord Palmerston is a statesman of
extraordinai, reseuroes. Indeed, his experience, extraordinary, resources. Indeed, his experience,
his tact, his judgmenel his inexhaustible his tact, his judgment his inexhaustible
good humour, and rare political sagacity, good humour, and rare political sagacity,
have maintained his party in power, when blunders have maintained his party in power, when blunders
of every kind have moat severely tried the patience of every kind have most severely tried the patience
of the ation. The Premier is one of the few Whigs of the ation. The Premier is one of the few Whigs
who have profited by their Conservative education; who have profited by their Conservative education;
he was a pupil of Pitt, and a contemporary of he was a pupil of Pitt, and a contemporary of
GreovillJ and Csatlereaegh, Wellington. GrevillE and Castlereagh, Wellington.
and Canning. Mor than half a century has elapsed and Canning. More than half a century has elapsed
since he learned his qualifications in a school since he learned his qualifications in a school
that produced the most eminent statesmen of that produced the most eminent statesmen of
his age; and though circumstances have made his age; and though circumstances have made
hint diverge from the path in which his career him diverge from the path in which his career
c ammenced, his early lessecn have enabled c commenced, his early lessees have enabled
him to maintain an elevated position in popular him to maintain an elevated position in popular
ehtimaton when thse reputation of his colleagues estimation when the reputation of his colleagues
has fallen to the ground -Cabioees of Wihlim has fallen to the ground -Cabioees of William
IV aben Vldoritr. WTHElr FOURTH AlID 3IBS FITZiElEBr~tr..._ IV when Vldoritr. WTHElr FOURTH AND MISS FITZiElEBr~tr..._
Williem IV, aelmst immediately adter the supreme William IV, against immediately after the supreme
phwer aed been placed in his andl, gavea very power and been placed in his and, gave a very
pleatsig evidencg of the kwnners of pleasing evidence of the corners of
bis heart An application was made to him on behalf his heart An application was made to him on behalf
of Ifr6. Fiht e-bert, of whose Matizracy with of Mrs. Fiht embers, of whose Matizracy with
his late brother, when Prince of Wales, he mnst his late brother, when Prince of Wales, he must
have bee aware. The king, It has boon- elated, have been aware. The king, It has been- elated,
invited her to lWidsor, treated aer with the invited her to lWidsor, treated her with the
greatest respeot, gave her permission to clothe greatest respect, gave her permission to clothe
her servants in tea royal livery1 placed implicit her servants in tea royal livery placed implicit
reliauce in-all her statemens, lnd having reliance in-all her statement, and having
anctioned an arrangem;ent ,cy which all her sanctioned an arrangement cy which all her
private papers were to be destroyed -with a private papers were to be destroyed with a
fewi exceptions that Iwere placed under seal few exceptions that were placed under seal
at w outt's baukiuon, -honpe-seted ipon her at w Court's banking, -honpe-seted upon her
an income of ular tte. a-yr. Mrs. FitAhlrbert an income of ular tte. ayr. Mrs. Fitzherbert
neve forgot this liberal conduct, and to the never forgot this liberal conduct, and to the
CloE of her life spoke of it with the moat eanest CluE of her life spoke of it with the most earnest
expressions nf griga- tude.-7e Cmen;ts and expressions of griga- tude.-7e Cements and
Cabists of Willcna I V atd Victofria. Cabins of Willcna I V and Victoria.